How to Freeze {and Thaw} Homemade Pizza Dough

Freezer cooking is SO easy with this tutorial on how to freeze pizza dough. Make a couple batches on the weekend, freeze, and enjoy on a busy weeknight!

Did you know that you can freeze pizza dough? At first, I thought it was crazy. Everybody knows that a bread with yeast in it needs a warm place to rise. The freezer, is most definitely not.

But after some encouragement from friends that it was actually possible, I decided to give in and experiment myself. I was extremely happy with the results!

In fact, it will be very rare for me to actually make a fresh batch of dough from now on. The freezer is just way too convenient, and allows me to whip up 2-3 recipes of pizza dough at one time. Which for this busy girl, is a must.

I feel I must give a bit of a disclaimer though. Meal planning with homemade pizza does take a little longer because the dough thaws and rises a total of 8 hours, but it is really nice to pull a bag out of the freezer in the morning, and not even think about it until dinner time.

The Process

Step 1: Mix up all the ingredients for pizza dough, but do not let the dough rise. Then shape into a ball, coat lightly in flour and place in a quart-sized freezer bag.

How to Freeze Homemade Pizza Dough

Make sure you label your bag, otherwise, you’ll never know exactly which large frozen ball is pizza dough vs the cookie kind! And depending on the outcome you were expecting, you could be quite disappointed.

Step 2: When you are ready to use the dough, pull the bag out of the freezer the morning you want to make it for dinner. Even though the dough was coated in flour before hand, it still has a tendency to stick to the insides of the bag. Don’t give up!

Place dough in a large bowl, cover with a kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place for about 8 hours.

rising pizza dough

At first, it might seem like the dough will never rise…it does takes quite a while to start. But once it gets going, it rises to almost double what it was before.

rising pizza dough

Step 3: When the 8 hours are up, the dough is ready to spread into a pizza pan, and sprinkled with extra, and I mean extra cheese. I suppose a few other toppings will do too. If you insist.

pizza toppings

Mmmm…doesn’t it look soooo good?

Homemade Pizza

If you still want to make this dough ahead of time, but need to use it sooner than the 8 hour timeframe, place dough in the fridge, and it will rise in half the time.

For lunch, just make dough first thing in the morning, and for an evening meal, make in the early afternoon.

See, now wasn’t that easy?!

Have you ever tried to freeze homemade pizza dough before?

Make sure you check out this recipe for the BEST homemade pizza dough, and if you missed any of the freezer cooking series, you can catch up on this page. 

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Comments

  1. maria says

    I freeze pizza dough all the time but the difference to your method is that I let it rise before freezing. I usually make double dough recipe, let it rise and then divide into two, use half and freeze the other. Seems to work either way!

    • says

      About how many hours would you say the dough as to rise after it comes out of the freezer? I wonder if it would be less time because you’ve already let it rise?

        • LoveAtFirstBite says

          Some recipes call for 2 rises versus 1 rise A) for the flavor development, more time for the yeast to feed on the starches in the dough, which causes more fermentation- responsible for the robust, yeasty flavors in some pizza doughs, breads, and croissants, and B) to further strengthen the gluten developed in the pizza dough, especially useful if the baker, cook plans to be hand-tossing their dough versus simply pressing it out- leads to a chewier dough with more “bite” instead of a bread-like/Chef Boyardee crust.

  2. says

    We make our own pizzas, but have always used the dough mix, since it’s so fast & cheap…probably not as healthy if I were to look into the ingredients of it though; thanks for sharing!

  3. Kathryn says

    I find the exact opposite works best for me. I let my dough rise for two hours. Punch down. Freeze in small baggies. A few days before pizza night, I put a bag in the fridge. I let it defrost in the fridge. I don’t take it out of the fridge until the minute I’m about to assemble the pizza. The very cold dough seems to behave better than warm dough, which has a tendency to stick and/or bounce back. I find the cold dough much easier to work with. I bake it then at 450 for 25 minutes and it comes out perfectly.

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